min read

UX Cognitive Audit - Chubb

Dig Case Study: uncovering subconscious insights

Chubb wanted to dig deeper and identify the psychological reasons why customers got frustrated with their global online claims portal. Read on to discover the insights that an Academic Literature Review and UX Observational Audit revealed.

The behavioural research challenge

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Dig

Uncover subconscious insights

Customer drop out during the online process for claiming for insurance was a problem for global insurer Chubb. These claims were often very long and very detailed and customers were becoming very frustrated during the submission process.

Through a systematic review of academic papers from Cowry’s proprietary Applied Knowledge Database, we identified a huge number of psychological principles relevant to the brief. With this knowledge, we then conducted an UX Online Audit to validate our academic insights in the real world.

The behavioural research solution

Through a systematic review of academic papers from Cowry’s proprietary Applied Knowledge Database, we identified a significant number of psychological principles relevant to the brief. With this knowledge, we then conducted an UX Online Audit to validate our academic insights in the real world.

These findings were then consolidated and written up into a comprehensive report compiling a total of 73 friction points within the current claims process.

Working with the Chubb innovation team and Cognizant, Cowry redesigned the entire portal globally.

The behavioural research findings

73 friction points in
total frustrating
customers
Poor management of
expectation created ambiguity
Poor emotional imagery
created cognitive dissonance

The literature review identified that a combination of lots of small friction points were contributing to an overall poor UX experience. The first page itself was not clear on what customers were expected to do and the call to action was difficult to identify. Within the process, the page transitions updating the claim were ambiguous and it was frustrating for customers as they waited with no clear guidance as to what was happening. The imagery used on pages for  serious ill health claims featured happy smiling families looking at your data on the screen, creating cognitive dissonance, as the customer was filling in sensitive and emotional details and data.

With this and other insights, this allowed our behavioural science team to redesign the pages to create a better customer experience

  • Manage Expectations : Throughout the journey, a new progress bar was adopted at the top of every screen, guiding the customers throughout their claim.

  • Create Certainty : When pages were updating, this was communicated to customers so they knew their details were being taken.

  • Connect Emotionally : Use imagery that showed people in control of their documentation, reassuring them emotionally.

 

Overall I believe it is flowing very well and it is in tune with the cognitive capabilities which we are developing

Leo Paul, Chubb

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